Working with Anthropologists

You might be thinking:

why should I work with an anthropologist when I know so little about them?

Let’s change that.


Hi, I am Nicole. I am an anthropologist and I want to apply what I’ve learned about studying people to help you reach your goals.

My goal with anthropology is to make strange things more familiar, and the familiar seem more strange.

Anthropology is a broad field of study, and you will likely find many parts of your life that could look different through an anthropological lens.


Rock-Art Vandals: An Assessment of Public Interactions with Archaeological Resources

“Rock Art Vandals: An Assessment of Public Interactions with Archaeological Resources.” Research presented at the Anthropology Research Symposium, Humboldt State University, March 24, 2016.

Abstract

This project studied the public opinions and discussion of the effects contemporary humans have at archaeological rock art sites in the United States. Preservation of rock art sites is attempted by a perpetual separation of visitors, by creating physical barriers at sites, or keeping site locations a secret. Little has been done, however, to assess public access to information relating to site locations and preservation information. This project utilized open-ended questionnaires to assess the opinions of the online rock-art community in relation to this topic. These opinions were compared with the content in public texts to assess the public accessibility of information. This research represents the potential of an affiliated public to make a significant contribution to the discussion on rock art site preservation and public interaction.

RAV word cloud
Word Cloud generated from Research Data

Modeling Consciousness in Archaeology: A Non-Invasive Approach

Abstract

Modeling the thoughts and beliefs of ancient persons is an arduous calling for archaeologists, as this data falls into the intangible realm. Often the most direct material link to the ancient mind is found in rock art. With resilience to the elements and time, rock surfaces presented an ideal canvas for the lasting expressions of past cultures. Many of these sites, however, have been damaged or compromised due to invasive recording practices. Researchers and tourists continue to utilize outdated methods, as a result of misinformation or naivety on the subject. A non-invasive, conservation-based approach to rock art recording is presented, with the intention of diminishing unintentional site vandalism. Symbols of headdresses, messengers, and lobed circles appear across differing chronological and regional rock art style categories. These elements are often interpreted in relation to altered states of consciousness and ceremony. The petroglyph panel at the Spirit Bird Cave site in southeastern Utah provides evidence of all three of these elements, and is thus well suited for this project. This poster presents the current status of the project, with a discussion of methods and preliminary field results. This project combines standard and innovative methods of field mapping, lighting and close-range photogrammetry to produce visual models which can be analyzed in a laboratory setting without concern for panel damage. These visual models can expand access to immovable data such as rock art, allowing researchers a truly non-invasive approach.

This poster was selected for the People’s Choice Award for Best Student Poster Presentation in the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, at Humboldt State University IdeaFest, 2014


Meme and My Friends: The Dynamics of Merry-making

“Meme and My Friends: The Dynamics of Merry-making,” November 29, 2012 

Collaborative poster presented at the 2012 Anthropology Undergraduate Research Symposium, Humboldt State University. Presented by Casey Dobbins, Jaqueline Farrington, Racheal Marte-Taylor, Cherilyn Neider and Nikki Martensen